AQA

GCSE English Language Paper 2 Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives

Question by Question Revision

 

Section A

Question 1 [4 marks]
The bread and butter: Show the examiner that you can select the correct information, even based on the smallest of details.

  • AO1
    Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas.
    Select and synthesise evidence from different texts

Hacks!

  • Use a ruler to guide your reading
  • Select the ‘hinge’ word from the question so you know what to hinge your focus on
  • Read through the source once first before you highlight anything

Question 2 [8 marks]
The bread and butter: Show the examiner you can recognise and explain how two sources are different.

Use details from both Sources. Write a summary of the differences.

  • AO1
    Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas.
    Select and synthesise evidence from different texts

Hacks!

  • Use a statement at the beginning of each point to show you see a difference/are focused on the question
  • Use mini quotations and weave them throughout your answer
  • Use connectives to signpost the differences (however, although, on the other hand)
  • Make inferences using words like: ‘emphasises’; ‘demonstrates’ etc.

Answer excerpt:
Eddie is a typical modern teenager who is cheeky and speaks to his father in a ‘mocking voice’ emphasising their close relationship and good humour with each other. Henry however is distant and formal with his father addressing him in a respectful tone, ‘my dear Father’ emphasising the difference in status between them.

Question 3 [12 marks]
The bread and butter: Show the examiner you can explain why the writer has chosen certain words and phrases and the impact that these have on the reader.

You now need to refer only to Source B. How does [the writer] use language to [for a specific effect]?

  • AO2
    Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views

Hacks!

  • Use statements to focus your points on the question
  • Use mini quotations and weave them throughout your answer
  • Specifically write that it is a simile, or emotive or another technique
  • Explore the effects of the words used, not the technique in isolation (the imagery is effective because it paints a picture is a big no no!)
  • Think about how the words make you FEEL and what you ASSOCIATE with them

 Answer excerpt:
Henry uses direct address to his father which suggests familiarity, ‘’you will not let …’, ‘you will let me come home’ and shows how his future is in the hands of his father, but this is also contrasted with a much more distant and formal mode of address, ‘my dear Father’. This noun phrase is repeated in a number of places as an emotional tool to try and reinforce that his father is ‘dear’ to him – though the distance and time lapse of them being together suggests to the reader this may not be so – and is a deliberate choice by Henry to appeal to his father.

Question 4 [16 marks]
The bread and butter: Show the examiner you can identify and explain the differences between two texts using evidence to support your ideas. You need to focus on methods (language) for this question, which is slightly different to Question 2.

For this question, you need to refer to the whole of Source A, together with Source B. Compare how the two writers convey their different [theme given].

In your answer, you could:

  • compare their different [theme]
  • compare the methods they use to convey [the theme]
  • support your ideas with references to both texts
  • AO3
    Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts.

Hacks!

  • Use statements using the question words to focus your points
  • Use connectives to signpost the differences (however, although, on the other hand)
  • Use mini quotations and weave them throughout your answer
  • Specifically write that it is a simile, or emotive or another technique
  • Explore the effects of the words used, not the technique in isolation (the imagery is effective because it paints a picture is a big no no!)
  • Think about how the words make you FEEL and what you ASSOCIATE with them

 Answer excerpt:
Jay Rayner uses humour to good effect in his article and uses it both in his attitudes to parenting, ‘too busy killing things on Skype’ – showing his warm, relaxed attitude to his son and in his attitudes to education. He refers to his own education using self-deprecating humour however, using the simile, ‘like a line of PacMen doing a conga to refer to his own grades. This is in direct contrast to ….

Section B

Question 5 [24 marks for content and organisation 16 marks for accuracy] – [40 marks]

The bread and butter: Show the examiner you can read and understand the point of view in a statement and respond to it with your own. Focus carefully on the PURPOSE; you will need to show you can write with this in mind.

Example:
‘Homework has no value. Some students get it done for them; some don’t do it at all. Students should be relaxing in their free time.’

 Write an article for a broadsheet newspaper in which you explain your point of view on this statement.

  • AO5 Content and Organisation
    Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences.
    Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts.
  • AO6 Technical Accuracy
    Candidates must use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation.

Hacks!

  • Plan your answer using a table or list. Decide what points you want to make first
  • Use statements using the question words to focus your points
  • Choose powerful and convincing words
  • Don’t be afraid to add a sense of drama!
  • Use techniques like hyperbole, rhetorical question and similes to add interest
  • Link your paragraphs together using connections and signposts like ‘furthermore’
  • Include anecdotes and examples to support your point of view

Answer excerpt:
The idea that homework has ‘no value’ has long been an issue of contention between the world of teachers and parents and the very different world of students. It remains clear to me that homework only has value if it is thoughtfully set, develops learning that is already taking place in the classroom and is set with other subjects and student work load in mind…

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1 comment on “GCSE English Language Paper 2 Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives

  1. Pingback: Educational Reader’s Digest | Friday 26th May – Friday 2nd June – Douglas Wise

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